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Why “Assuming the Yes” Can Not Only Change Your Business … but Also Your Life

Today we welcome guest blogger Michele PW (Pariza Wacek) to share a few golden nuggets she experienced at my recent Lifestyle LIVE! event. Take it away Michele!

Have you ever heard Melinda Cohan talk about how she assumes the yes?

During her recent first-ever live event, “Lifestyle LIVE,” she taught a segment about how she assumes the yes in enrollment conversations, and why doing the same can be a powerful shift for you.

(In fact, here’s a link to the video snippet where she explains from the stage.)

So, what might “assuming the yes” look like for you? Well, to start, it doesn’t look like you’re ATTACHED to the yes. You’re not pursuing the prospect, or trying to twist her arm, or saying anything to get her to plunk down her money.

You’re assuming the yes; you’re not attached to it.

For Melinda, it looks like this: she comes to the enrollment conversation prepared. She uses The Coaches Console (what else?) to prepare the contract so when the prospect says “yes,” she can pull it up and walk that person through it herself, right then and there.

One of the reasons this concept is so powerful is because you may actually be unconsciously repelling your prospect, if you’re not prepared to welcome him into your business.

Think about it:

If you have no contract ready, or a good way to accept payment, or a messy (or nonexistent) welcome packet … then all you really have is the headache of onboarding a new client “willy nilly.”

Plus, if you’re not a full-body, 100% yes to accepting new clients, how comfortable do you think your prospects are going to feel in the enrollment conversation?



I was profoundly affected, when I first heard Melinda teach this concept. Why?

Well, have you ever heard of the Enneagram?

If so, you know it’s a way to identify your patterns around your wounds. That’s a useful tool, if you want to break the negative cycles you find yourself stuck in.

So, I’m an Enneagram 6, which means I’m a worrier (and I’m talking massive here, folks).

If you know anything about me, that will strike you as a bit ironic … because my entire business has shifted to a love-based foundation, instead of fear-based.

The Enneagram changed everything for me, because now, when fear or worry or anxiety comes up for me, I’m able to feel and process those emotions by breaking the pattern and getting out of it quickly.

Sure, I still feel fear and worry sometimes. But it doesn’t keep me stuck the way it used to. (And even though I feel worry from time to time, I no longer worry. Does that make sense?)

And, yes, some of my old thought processes still exist … like the idea of the “other shoe dropping.”



To me, assuming the yes, means I’m not waiting for the other shoe to drop, and that can be problematic for me.

You see, along with my worry habit came the realization that I had created a false “story” about my worry—I allowed it to be a sort of “magical talisman” to keep me safe.

I figured I could keep the bad things from actually happening to me if I worried about them. (Think of it this way: how many things that you worry about actually happen? My worry attracted more things for me to worry about, but the specific bad things rarely actually happened.)

So, in my mind, if I started assuming the yes, I would have to take cover from all the dropping shoes!

Okay, I joke. But I really do want you to think about this question:

Are you assuming the yes or the no, in your enrollment conversations?

If you’re assuming the no, why?

Are your fears getting the best of you?

The fear of “jinxing” yourself? Of the disappointment that comes with the no, if you’re expecting the yes?

Whatever it is, I invite you to flip your perspective.

What would happen if you assumed the yes instead?

Michele PW (Pariza Wacek) is the best-selling author of the “Love-Based Business” series of books that share how to sell more with love and build a solid, profitable business on a foundation of love. In addition, she owns a copywriting and marketing company along with writing and publishing fiction. To grab your free book “How to Start a Business You Love AND That Loves You Back,” visit LoveBasedBiz.com

 

Our Mission Now More Than Ever

by: Melinda Cohan, November 2016

If you’re like so many of the people I’ve talked to in the past couple of days—since Tuesday’s election—you might feel a bit paralyzed right now.

If you’ve spent any time on social media, or in line at the grocery store, or at the coffee shop, you’ve undoubtedly heard symptoms of a nation deeply divided; of a deeply divided humanity. Right now, there is a strong sense of “us versus them,” and “right versus wrong.”

You may feel like nothing you can do can change this. You may feel hopeless as a coach.

I have an exercise that can get you back on the path to making the impact you DO make, by serving others.

It can help you refocus – to regain clarity about why you’re doing what you’re doing – and it can help you move forward, even in the darkest of times.

And this is one of those dark times, isn’t it?

That’s why it’s a perfect time to revisit why you’re here, so you can reposition yourself, continue moving forward, and help us heal, as a country.

And I want you to know that here at The Coaches Console, our leadership team just went through this exercise ourselves, again. It doesn’t matter if you’re just starting, or if you’ve been in business for a long time, like we have (13 years, to be exact). It is ALWAYS good to check in on your mission, to make sure it’s exactly what you want and need it to be.

So as the end of each year approaches, we evaluate why we’re doing what we’re doing. We develop a vision for the coming year, in relation to our mission, and we create plans for fulfilling that vision. Finally, we talk about which values we can embrace to accomplish the vision.

That’s why today, I’m sharing the following two-part exercise with you … so you too can revisit, reexamine, and refocus your mission.

Ready?

Let’s do this.

Exercise: Revisit, Reexamine, Refocus

Part One. Get Clear on Your Why.

We’ve listed three questions below; ask yourself any or all of them, because each one offers a unique path for identifying what’s most important to you. Different approaches work for different people, so answer whichever ones feel most comfortable to you.

And write down your answers, so you have them in black and white as you grow and revisit this exercise again and again.

1. What is my mission, “why statement,” or destiny?

Your answer to this question provides a “big picture” view of your business. It’s your solution to a threat to this planet and humanity. Look at what’s going wrong in the world, and consider how you feel called to help right that wrong.
This is something that may bubble up inside you, or it may be something you feel really strongly about. Either way, you’ll feel it.
It’s likely that it will reflect a common denominator of your past work and experience. For example, I worked as a florist in high school. I also had a job decorating houses for an interior design department. In a different job, I worked with companies and their businesses and team environments. In yet another job, I coached people. The common denominator: to help people live their full potential, in whatever form that takes. It’s completely unrelated to job titles, but that common denominator was at the core of each of those jobs. List your previous experiences, and determine that common denominator.

2. What makes me feel sad about humanity or the world we live in, and what would I like to see changed or improved?

3. What excites me and inspires me to make a difference?

Spending some time with these questions should give you the perspective you need to dial in on what your mission is now, and whether you may want to consider changing your focus … or to reassure you that you’re already on the right track.

As I mentioned above, our team just went through this process ourselves. We discovered that our mission is spot on, and it helped us recollect, and refocus.

And now more than ever, we know it’s critical that we keep that mission at the forefront of our minds and make sure everything we do—every client we serve, every project on which we work—is all about this mission.

Part Two. Define Your Vision.

The purpose of this part of the exercise is to help you determine exactly what you’ll do in this next year to fulfill the mission you just re-clarified in Part One.

Consider your vision for the next year.

When you close your eyes and envision your business at the end of next year, it’s December, 31, 2017, what have you accomplished that supports your mission?

Paint the picture of where you see yourself then, and, more importantly, focus on how that feels to you.

Remember, write this down.

In Closing

Now that you’re clear on your mission and vision again, remember that your courage and your mission must be louder than the hopeless voice – the gremlins – in your head.

What will you do, every single day, to make sure that little voice doesn’t run your life and your business?

What will you do, daily, to further your mission?

I’ll say it again: the world needs you now more than ever.

One last thought I’d like to share with you now:

I believe women will change the face of this planet. I believe we already are, and we will continue to do so. Further, I believe entrepreneurs will change our global culture.

When you combine those things together, you get us: women entrepreneurs.

And together, we are unstoppable.

No matter where you live or what your culture is or what situation you’re currently in, when you bring women entrepreneurs together, we ARE the transformation in this world. Your work is needed, and your business will leverage your work faster than anything.

This is why your business is so important. This is why you must nail and master your mission, your business, and get your work, your message, out there.

And to all you guys out there—thank you for being champions of the amazing women in your life!